Six Common Energy Efficiency Myths

Energy Efficiency Myths

Myth One

If I turn up the thermostat the room will get warm much more quickly.

This is not the case. A thermostat simply controls the maximum temperature, so turning it up will not alter how long the heating takes to achieve that room temperature.

Myth Two

It is more efficient to keep the heating on low all the time than to keep turning it on and off.

This means that your house is heated when you are not there and that it may be cold when you are home. It is far better, in terms of energy efficiency, to use a timer to heat the rooms that you are using while you are there. On a regular daily cycle, it is not necessary to have the heating on constantly to keep the fabric of the house warm. If you are away in winter, use a timer and thermostat to avoid frost damage to pipes. You can use radiator valves to restrict the heating to the rooms that you are using. Most people find 18°C to 21°C comfortable in an occupied room, and radiators can be turned down to 14°C or lower in other rooms.

Myth Three

When it is cold outside I need to turn the thermostat up to keep the house warm.

A thermostat maintains a desired temperature in the house no matter what the weather is doing outside.  Once you have selected your comfortable temperature, it can remain at that setting which improves your home’s energy efficiency.

Myth Four

Energy saving light bulbs take a long time to get bright, and they are very expensive.

There have been improvements in lighting technology in the last few years, especially with light emitting diode (LED) bulbs. They reach full brightness immediately, have reduced in price, typically last for over 20 years and their running costs are approximately a third of those of a comparable traditional halogen bulb.  

LED bulbs are now the best choice in terms of practicality and energy efficiency.

Myth Five

An appliance in standby mode does not use much energy..

Appliances on standby still use electricity. For an average household, turning them all off completely when they are not in use could save nearly £50 a year.

Myth Six

My vital appliances are responsible for much of the energy I use, so there is nothing I can do to reduce consumption.

Large appliances are responsible for about 15% of the energy bill for an average home, so dealing with the energy efficiency of heating is a greater priority. Nevertheless, choosing energy efficient appliances can also make a real reduction in consumption and bills. Compare energy labels on appliances before buying. Choosing an A+++ tumble dryer rather than a C-rated model can save approximately £50 per year.  A new A+++ electric oven will use some 60% less energy than a B-rated equivalent. 

Careful planning of how you use your appliances could also help. Dishwashers are very energy hungry, and can cost an average household nearly £50 a year to run. Consider whether you really need to use it to wash a few plates and make sure you wait for a full load before turning it on.

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